5 Medical Devices That Changed The World

5 Medical Devices That Changed The World

by Gorilla Jobs in Facts & Figures 22/01/2018

5 Medical Devices That Changed The World

While thinking of Medical Devices many doctors may think of modern inventions. Yet, many devices helped us to manage and treat diseases for centuries. Many of them are so ubiquitous that we take them too often for granted.

Below the picture, you will find our Top 5 pics of Medical Gadgets that changed the world. 

5 Medical Devices That Changed The World

 

DEVICE 1# BLOOD GLUCOSE MONITOR

Blood glucose monitoring reveals individual patterns of blood glucose changes, and helps in the planning of meals, activities, and at what time of day to take medications.Also, testing allows for quick response to high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). This might include diet adjustments, exercise, and insulin (as instructed by the health care provider).

Current technology to measure glucose in the blood includes the use of a portable testing meter called the blood glucose monitor. Using the device, a finger prick blood sample applied onto a chemical test-strip generates a simple numerical read-out within seconds.

More sophisticated blood glucose monitors in development include a non-invasive glucose breathalyzer device and an implantable real-time glucose sensor that also releases insulin in a responsive manner.

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BLOOD GLUCOSE MONITOR

 

DEVICE #2 CLINICAL THERMOMETER

The medical thermometer began as an instrument more appropriately called a water thermoscope, constructed by Galileo Galilei circa 1592–1593. It lacked an accurate scale with which to measure temperature and could be affected by changes in atmospheric pressure.

Italian physician Santorio Santorio is the first known individual to have put a measurable scale on the thermoscope and wrote of it in 1625, though he possibly invented one as early as 1612. His models were bulky, impractical and took a fair amount of time to take an accurate oral reading of the patient’s temperature.

Prominent Dutch mathematician, astronomer, and physicist Christiaan Huygens created a clinical thermometer in 1665.

In 1868, German physician, pioneer psychiatrist, and medical professor Carl Reinhold August Wunderlich published his studies that consisted of over one million readings from twenty-five thousand patients’ temperatures, taken in the underarm. With his findings, he was able to conclude a healthy human’s temperature fell within the range of 36.3 to 37.5 °C (97.34 to 99.5 °F).

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CLINICAL THERMOMETER

 

DEVICE #3 X-RAY IMAGING

X-RAY IMAGING (Or Radiography) is an imaging technique using X-rays to view the internal structure of an object. To create the image, a beam of X-rays, a form of electromagnetic radiation, are produced by an X-ray generator and are projected toward the object.  A certain amount of X-ray is absorbed by the object, dependent on its density and composition.

The X-rays that pass through the object are captured behind the object by a detector (either photographic film or a digital detector).

The generation of flat two-dimensional images by this technique is called projection radiography. Computed tomography (CT scanning) is where multiple 2D images from different angles undergo computer processing to generate 3D representations.

Applications of radiography include medical (or “diagnostic”) radiography and industrial radiography. Similar techniques are used in airport security (where “body scanners” generally use backscatter X-ray).

Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen won the first ever Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901 for his discovery of electromagnetic radiation in a wavelength range known today as X-rays. After accidentally discovering radiation that could pass through various substances that are opaque to ordinary light, Röntgen tested his invention by photographing his wife’s hand, which clearly revealed her wedding ring and the bones in her fingers.

Since then, X-rays have had many important uses in medicine: doctors use X-rays to study our bones while dentists use X-rays to detect diseases of the teeth. X-rays are also used in radiotherapy to stop cancer cells from growing and multiplying.

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X-RAY IMAGING

DEVICE #4 DRUG-ELUTING STENT

A drug-eluting stent (DES) is a peripheral or coronary stent (a scaffold) placed into narrowed, diseased peripheral or coronary arteries that slowly releases a drug to block cell proliferation. This prevents fibrosis that, together with clots (thrombi), could otherwise block the stented artery, a process called restenosis. The stent is usually placed within the peripheral or coronary artery by an interventional cardiologist or interventional radiologist during an angioplasty procedure.

Drug-eluting stents in current clinical use were approved by the FDA after clinical trials showed they were statistically superior to bare-metal stents for the treatment of native coronary artery narrowings, having lower rates of major adverse cardiac events (usually defined as a composite clinical endpoint of death + myocardial infarction + repeat intervention because of restenosis).

The first drug-eluting stents to be approved in Europe and the U.S. were coated with paclitaxel or a mTOR inhibitor, such as sirolimus.

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DRUG-ELUTING STENT

DEVICE #5 HYPODERMIC NEEDLE

Ancient Greeks and Romans used thin, hollow tools to introduce fluids into the body, a precursor to the modern needle. In 1656, Christopher Wren used a goose quill as a crude needle to deliver intravenous injections into dogs.

The hypodermic needle as we know it was invented in the mid-1800s by Charles Pravaz and Alexander Wood. Hypodermic refers to anything just below the surface of the skin.

Today, the hypodermic needle is used together with a syringe to inject or extract fluids, medication, and blood from our bodies with minimal pain and reduced risk of contamination.

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HYPODERMIC NEEDLE

 

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